Highlights of the Berlin Climate and Security Conference 2022

Opening session of the BCSC 2022. German Foreign Minister Annalena Baerbock speaks in the panel "Climate–Conflict–Clash of Crises: Weathering the Risks" with Khadiija Maxamed Al Makhzoumin (Minister of Environment and Climate Change of Somalia), Mariam bint Mohammed Almheiri (Minister of Climate Change & Environment in the UAE), and Johanna Sumuvuori (State Secretary, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Finland)

Download the summary of BCSC 2022

This summary presents the main highlights of the conference.

BCSC 2022 Summary

BCSC 2022 connected important initiatives in the climate security space on their way to COP27 and beyond, facilitating deliberation across and between governmental and civil society stakeholders from around the globe. This included discussions with the Climate Security Expert Network, the Climate Security Mechanism, CCCPA with its initiative Climate Responses for Sustaining Peace, the Planetary Security Initiative, Weathering Risk partners and over 20 governments supporting the Climate for Peace Initiative.

BCSC participants welcomed the progress made by key international actors such as the UN, the World Food Program, the OSCE, NATO and the African Union and saw them exchange on their progress and challenges, preparing next steps. Conference sessions discussed for example lessons learned from the mediators in the Weathering Risk Peace Pillar; the OSCE’s dialogues in South-Eastern Europe, the South Caucasus and Central Asia; the World Food Programme’s efforts to integrate climate security risks into food system support in East Africa; the PREVIEW project; and NATO’s efforts to systematically integrate climate change into its thinking.

READ the Chair's Summary.

BCSC 2022 at a glance

Who: High-level political actors, climate security experts, international organisations and practitioners

What: Since its inaugural edition in 2019, BCSC has become the global forum connecting important stakeholders working to better address the impacts of climate change on international peace and security through diplomacy, development and defence approaches

When: 11-12 October 2022 (In-person, invitation only); 17-20 October 2022 (Online) 

Where: The in-person segment of BCSC took place in Berlin at the German Federal Foreign Office 

Why: To address climate impacts on peace and stability and its interlinkages with current geopolitical challenges

AgendaThe in-person agenda (11-12 October) can be viewed here. For those who couldn't join in person or want to rewatch sessions, you can view the livestream recording below. The digital segment agenda (17-20 October) can be viewed here. The video recordings are available below.

Background

Speaker overview

BCSC in the media

Jennifer Morgan, State Secretary and Special Envoy for International Climate Action at the German Federal Foreign Office, speaking at the Launch of the 'Climate, Environment, Peace and Security Initiative'

A highlight was the launch of the Climate for Peace Initiative (#Climate4Peace) during the opening ceremony. In an interactive fishbowl discussion, participating countries committed to enhance projects in line with the principles laid out in on the Climate, Environment, Peace and Security Declaration that has been endorsed by over 20 governments:

  • Aligning our actions within the constraints that the planetary boundaries imply - especially with the need to limit global temperature increase to 1.5 °C
  • Supporting states and regions where stability and peace are affected most by climate-and environment-related risks
  • Improving resilience and adaptation by ensuring that all our policies and practices are inclusive, climate-, context- and conflict-sensitive, gender-responsive, and tailored to local conditions and stakeholder needs, while also keeping in mind that the international community has asserted the importance of the human right to a clean, healthy and sustainable environment.

WATCH:

11-12.October: In-person segment

Germany's Foreign Minister Annalena Baerbock opens the BCSC 2022 (Also available in Arabic and French)

Climate – Conflict – Clash of Crises: Weathering the Risks (Also available in Arabic and French)

Launch of the Climate, Environment, Peace and Security Declaration and Initiative (Also available in Arabic and French)

Weathering Risks within our Planetary Boundaries                                                                              

Spotlight on Climate for Peace: The way to COP and beyond

Towards a Green Central Asia: Preventive and stabilizing climate foreign policy

Weathering Risk: From Risk to Resilience                                                      

The Nature of Conflict and Peace: The links between environment, security and peace

Protecting the vulnerable while improving human security: The Global Shield against climate risks and other approaches

Tanks, Troops and Temperature Rise: Implementing NATO's Climate Security Strategy

CLOSING SESSION - Resolving Conflict & Clashing Crises: Where hard and soft security challenges converge

 

 

17-20.October: Digital segment

The nature of conflict  and peace: The links between  environment, security and peace  and their importance for the United  Nations

Climate security in the current and future global conflict landscape

 

Building peace & protecting the environment: Supporting civil society in the Middle East

Climate change and human mobility, conflict sensitivity and food insecurity in the Karamoja Cluster

Justice at the heart of conflict prevention: Exploring rule of law responses to climate insecurity risks

Climate change and human security: Building integrated early warning systems to increase resilience in the Sahel

Data analytics and better decision making: New public climate and security dashboard of the German Federal Foreign Office

Turning Africa's Climate-Security Risks into Opportunities                                                                                                             

Ways forward to weather compounding and cascading climate-security risks

How can Climate Risk Management be Strengthened in Conflict Zones?